20 Halloween Costume Hacks You ALREADY Have at Home

 

Ink yourself with makeup or non-toxic markers.

The spooky scene: you’re all alone on your couch in the darkness. Suddenly, your phone rings. You nearly jump out of your seat when you see you’ve been invited to that hot Halloween party – but you have nothing to wear!

Never fear: 20 EASY hacks are here – and most of them can be created from stuff you have lying around the house. Read on.

20 Incredibly Easy Costume Hacks From Your Home

Put an old lampshade on your head and hang a sign around your neck that says “Life of the Party.”

Roll up the sleeves of a black or silk screen t-shirt. Draw flowers, swirls and the word “MOM” on your arms and upper chest with makeup or non-toxic magic markers and be a biker.

Get fully clothed and hang a sign around your neck that reads “Nudist On Strike.”

Have a headband lying around? Cut animal ears out of paper, color them, and glue them to the headband, then wear the headband ears on your head, along with an outfit in coordinating colors.

Paint on a scruffy “beard” with mascara. Scrunch a knit hat down over your head. Put on your messiest clothing, leaving it partially untucked. Punch holes in a piece of cardboard, jaggedly cut away. Tie a string through the holes. Write “Will Work For Candy” on the sign and hang it around your neck.

Grab your own – or your roomie’s or sister’s – makeup bag. Make yourself up as a  zombie by dabbing bone-white matte shadow all over your face and painting “blood” spatters with lipstick. Dab black circles around your eyes with matte shadow.

Charlie Brown. wonderhowto.com

Draw an up-and-down pattern in black magic marker around a yellow shirt and be Charlie Brown.

Be a slasher film prom girl by repurposing an old outfit you were planning on tossing.  Slash the dress up a bit (you know you want to!) and add “blood” spatters with lipstick. Grab an old play tiara or cut one out of cardboard and spray paint it gold or silver if you have these colors hanging around your garage. Wear it askew on your head.

Work with what you have naturally! If you’re a woman with long, dark hair and you have a black dress or black skirt and shirt stashed somewhere in your closet, do up your hair in braids and be Wednesday Addams. Work out a lot? Shred an old shirt, paint open areas green with green eyeshadow mixed into makeup base and be The Incredible Hulk.

Glue multicolored pom-pom balls all over a white shirt. Pair with a red skirt or pants if you have them (otherwise, black or jeans will do). Ta-da – you’re a gumball machine.

Scarecrow. heavy.com

Have autumn/Halloween leaf decorations up (or stored in your garage)? Tape them all over autumn-colored clothes such as yellow, orange, red or brown and be a tree.

Find torn up old duds and a hat you were about to toss and be a scarecrow. Add circle cheeks and other scarecrow face decor with makeup if you’d like. If you have hay or straw decor around your house, stuff a little into your wrist and pants cuffs.

Put some lemons in a bowl and write “LIFE” in marker on an old t-shirt. You are now life, handing out lemons.

The most interesting man in the world. mashable.com

Grab an old black suit jacket and an empty Dos Equis container, paint on a beard and mustache if you don’t already have one and be The Most Interesting Man in the World.

Put a bandanna on your head. Wear a plaid shirt with the sleeves rolled up and a pair of jeans with the cuffs rolled. Put on lots of red lipstick. Voila – you’re Rosie the Riveter.

Know someone who wears a uniform to his or her job and is willing to “loan” it? There you go: instant “costume”! Careful: don’t try to wear a police or other uniform that could get the lender in trouble. Borrow a football or cheerleader uniform, one from a big-box store, or scrubs.

Put black tape in a stick-figure formation on a white shirt and pants, tie a smiley circle around your head and be a stick figure.

Have a lot of black in your closet? Put on a black shirt and black jeans and safety-pin a full black skirt to the back of the neck of the shirt and to each cuff of the shirt. Spread your wings, and you have an instant bat costume.

Take dozens of Post-It Notes and write “Hello, my name is…” with a different name on each. Post them all over your shirt. Your costume? Identity thief.

Grab some pajamas, put your hair up in pigtails, grab your child’s or a friends stuffed animal (or that old teddy bear you still have in your closet – come on, admit it) and be a big baby for Halloween. Hey, at least you’ll get more candy that way!

Recipe: Whoa! Make This AMAZING Face-Hugger Chicken

 

It’s gory, it’s creepy, it’s…chicken? Every once in a while we come across a recipe that literally blows our black little socks off. Today we give you this AMAZING “face hugger” (from the Alien movie franchise) feast, direct from the culinary artistry of Eat the Dead. Thanks, fellas – this is true genius!

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Copyright eatthedead.com ~ Reprinted from: Nov. 14, 2017

So, as some of you may know, I made an Alien’s inspired chest burster turkey last year for Thanksgiving…or as I’m now calling it: Fangsgiving…

And while it turned out amazingly delicious, I was also told in no uncertain terms that I would not be able to make another chestburster for this year’s holiday…and because I love my family, I agreed.

But nobody said ANYTHING about not making an Alien’s inspired Facehugger chicken!

BEHOLD!  THE FACEHUGGER FEAST!

Made from a full-sized roasting chicken, snow crab legs, and a homemade chicken sausage tail, this sweet slab of petrifying poultry is smokey, succulent, and has just enough bite from a secret ingredient to make you cautiously come back for more.

In short, it’s damn good.

This recipe is a bit involved.  It takes a good 24 hours and includes multiple steps and a few unique ingredients, but trust me when I say, it’s so worth the effort…both visually and for how good it tastes.

Now, before we get too far into this, let me say that yes, this can absolutely be done with a turkey as well and would make the perfect show-stopping centerpiece to any Thanksgiving meal.  I just didn’t have the oven space for a full turkey face hugger.  Maybe next year?!

To make your own Facehugger Feast, the first thing we need to do is prep the chicken.

24-hours ahead of time, brine your chicken.  To do this you will need:

  • 1 roasting chicken
  • 1 gallon water
  • 1/2 cup Kosher salt
  • 2/3 cup light brown sugar

In a large pot on the stove, mix together your water, salt and brown sugar.  Over medium heat, mix until fully dissolved.  Allow to cool completely.

Place your chicken into a large container and pour your brine over, fully covering the chicken.

Pop the whole thing into the fridge for at least 4 hours, and up to 24 hours.

Now let’s work on the rub.  You will need:

  • 3 Tablespoons olive oil
  • teaspoons garlic powder
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • teaspoons ground cumin
  • teaspoons onion powder
  • teaspoon smoked paprika
  • teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon chipotle chili powder

Whisk all these ingredients together and set aside for 30 minutes to really get acquainted.

Let’s also make our honey glaze.

For this you will need:

  • 2/3 cup Ghost Pepper honey*
  • 2 Tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 2 Tablespoons yellow mustard
  • 2 Tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • teaspoons lemon juice

*The secret to the sweet heat in this recipe is the ghost-pepper honey.  I found some a few weeks ago on Instagram from a company called The Beecreeper.  Seriously, this stuff is intense!  They’re still working on setting up their website, but you can bug (ha!) them on IG @_beecreeper_

If you can’t snag your own ghost pepper honey, simply add 3 teaspoons of chili powder…but know it’s just not going to be the same.

Whisk all this together and set aside for 30 minutes as well.

While that’s resting, let’s move onto the next step.

For this you will need:

  • Your rub
  • Your glaze
  • Your brined chicken (patted dry)
  • 3 feet of sausage casing
  • Butcher’s twine
  • 1 additional boneless chicken breast
  • 1/4 cup chicken broth
  • .5 oz (roughly 1/2 teaspoon) transglutaminase** powder.

**Remember our earlier recipe, the Chili Con Carnage?  We discuss in depth there exactly what transglutaminase powder is and where to get it.

We’re going to start out by first spatchcocking our chicken.

Wait…spatchwhat?

Spatchcocking…and before you let your dirty little mind run off into the gutter, let me explain exactly what spatchcocking is.

When you spatchcock a chicken, you remove the backbone (ie: spine) and flatten the whole thing out before cooking.  This is done for a number of reasons.

In normal cooking a spatchcocked chicken roasts in just 30 minutes, which is actually 15 minutes less than a normal roasting meaning tons of saved time.

It also exposes more of the bird to dry heat, resulting in a crispy, crunchy skin.

And while this is all good, we’re doing it for another, more artistic reason.

This is a face hugger:

This is a spatchcocked chicken:

See the similarity?

Okay, true…we’re missing the tail and a few other details need to be adjusted, but it’s the same general shape!

To spatchcock your chicken (quit giggling, I can hear you!) pat your brined chicken dry and flip onto your cutting board, breast down.

Using a pair of strong shears, cut along both sides of the spinal column lengthwise on your chicken, splitting your bird in half from tail to tip and completely removing the spine.

Congratulations, you now have before you a spineless chicken…or as I like to call it: My ex.  

Now we need to remove those pesky wings and legs.

From the INSIDE of your bird, carefully locate the top joints of your legs (aka drumsticks) and slice through those.  Pull the legs up through the skin, basically turning it inside out.  Cut the skin off at the base of the leg bone closest to where the feet would be if they were still attached.

Flip your bird over, breast side up, and carefully remove the wings, trying to ensure that your cuts are as close to the skin and as small as possible.  Now smoosh your bird flat, pressing the breast back into the board with the palm of your hands.  You’ll hear some crunches…don’t worry, that’s normal.

You should end up with something that looks like this:

Save the legs, wings, and spine for another recipe.

Now that that is done, move your chicken to a large aluminum foil lined cookie sheet with high edges and give it a good rubdown with your rub.

In a food processor, combine your boneless chicken breast, 2 tablespoons of your rub (you should have plenty, don’t worry) and your transglutaminase powder.  Pulse until you end up with a thick paste.

Drizzle in enough chicken broth to form a thick milkshake like slurry.  Mmm…meat slurry!  The goal here is to create a mixture that is just barely liquid enough to be easy to jam through a funnel into your sausage casing.

Tie a knot at one end of your casing.  Pull the open end of your casing over the nozzle end of a funnel and pull up the rest of your casing like it’s a sock and your nozzle is a very strange looking foot.

Scoop your meat slurry into your funnel.  Using the blunt end of a wooden spoon handle, jam the slurry through your funnel and into the casing.  Don’t worry if it’s not evenly distributed yet, just fill the casing up until you’ve used all your slurry.

Once you fill it all the way up, tie a knot in the open end of your casing at about the 2 1/2 foot mark.  Gently squeeze your casing, evenly distributing the meat slurry through the whole thing.

Using your butcher’s twine, wrap your casing starting at one end and ending about 6? below the other end.  This will be the crest of your hugger body as well as your tail.

Loosen the skin all along the back of your chicken.  Do this by gently sliding your hand between the skin and the meat of your chicken and lifting upwards. Don’t completely separate your skin from the edges or on the leg section of your roast…you just want to create a large pocket in the back for the crest tube (sausage) and legs (coming soon).

Stuff the unwrapped end of your chicken sausage between the skin and the meat on the back of your chicken, pulling the knotted end all the way through so it sticks out the neck area of your roast.  The rest should be sticking out the bottom as a tail.  I used two toothpicks to pinch the chicken skin closed over the back of the chicken where the tail went in to help keep it in place. Curve the tail back and forth on itself so the entire thing fits on your cookie sheet.  Next, take another toothpick and give the entire tail a few pokes through the casing.  You don’t want to do too many, but a few along the length every few inches or so will allow the steam that will result from cooking escape.  Forgetting to do this can result in a tail that splits or blows up while cooking.

Give the tail a good rubdown with the rub as well.

Now let’s prep your facehugger so you can attach the legs later.

For this, you’ll need 8 holes for your crab legs, 4 for each side.

I’m going to be completely honest with you and tell you that the first time I made this dish, I jammed the legs in before cooking the chicken (hence all these photos).  This ruined the crab legs. If you decide to do it this way, know ahead of time that we’re cooking this beast at a temperature that will dry your crab legs out and make them taste awful.  Trust me, you will NOT want to eat them…so I strongly suggest either getting the cheapest legs you can find that you don’t mind ruining, or stick them in at the end.

All the photos in this tutorial are of me doing it the wrong way…putting the crab legs in before roasting the chicken.  Don’t do this…but for now, just deal with the fact that I made a mistake and you’re benefitting from it.

I picked up a right half and left half set of snow crab legs for $8 total at my grocer.  Get just the legs…you don’t need the claws.

Using a sharp knife, slit your chicken along the “back” in three slices on both sides and two in the front using this template as a guide:

Using your tin foil, twist up 8 tubes approximately the same size as your crab legs and jam them in as place-holders for now.

Size them appropriately to your crab legs, starting with the largest ones in the back and getting smaller as you go.  Save the two smallest legs for the front.

IF YOU ROAST YOUR CRAB LEGS, tuck your legs up so they’re “crawling” and use the edge of your cookie sheet to keep them in place.

A ball of aluminum foil, wadded up, works well to keep the front elevated and in place.

Give the whole thing another rubdown with your rub.

Now let’s add some glaze!  Using a food safe brush, give your entire face hugger (except the legs) a nice thick layer of glaze.

Pop into a 350F/175C oven and set your timer for 15 minutes.

At the 15 minute mark, pull it out and give it another thick basting with your glaze.  Return to the oven for another 15 minutes and repeat the glazing.

At the half-hour mark, pull out, wrap the legs in tin foil to keep them from burning, give it one more good swab with your glaze, and return to the oven for a final 10-minute stint.

All in all, you’ll be roasting it for 40 minutes.  I know I said a spatchcocked chicken takes only 30 minutes to roast, but because we’ve added so much to it, super soaked it with the glaze, and have a chicken sausage tail, we need to ensure food safety by guaranteeing the interior reaches a consumption safe temperature of 165F/73C.  Test for doneness by taking an internal temperature reading at the thickest part of the roast.

when it’s done, pull it out of the oven and remove the foil from your crab legs.

If you haven’t roasted your crab legs (good on you) NOW is the time to insert them into your roast beast.  Gently pull out your aluminum foil place holders and swap in your crab legs.

Gently snip off the butcher twine from your sausage tail now as well.  Allow it to rest for 5 minutes and then transfer to your serving platter.

Bask in the enviable glow that comes from creating something so damn devious looking and so damn tasty!

I mean, come on…  Look at this thing!
 Carve into this beautiful bastard and enjoy!
Happy Thanksgiving and…

Bone Appetite!

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This recipe post was reprinted with express permission from eatthedead.com. PLEASE ask permission from any site if you see a recipe or tutorial you’d like to share. For more information on this amazingly artistic crew, contact them here

13 Totally Weird Superstitions

 

Broken mirrors, black cats…ceiling fans? You’d be surprised at the absolutely weird and wonderful superstitions that famed cultures have drummed up. Here are 13 of the strangest superstitions ever to span the globe, but don’t laugh – you might be next!

1. Night of the Living Gum

According to legend, superstitious Turks believe that if one chews gum after dark, the chaw will turn into dead flesh. (And as we all know…death lasts an Extra, Extra, Extra long time.)

 

2. Wait! Don’t Turn On That Fan!

Superstitious snoozers in various areas of Asia believe that falling asleep with a fan blowing in the room will result in death. Not cool, guys. Not cool.

 

3. That’s a Hairy Cute Baby

Romanians – famous for vampires, werewolves and all creatures that go slurp in the night – believe if you beat animals, your next child will be very, very hairy. We suspect a wandering wife with an eye for chest fuzz made this one up.

 

4. An Unlucky Dozen

If you give an even number of flowers to a Russian paramour, you’re likely to be unlucky twice: first, even numbers portend fatality – and second, wishing death on your beloved is just NOT a panty-dropper.

 

5. Shear Fear

Japanese believe that if you trim your nails at night, you’ll die prematurely. (Sure, Grandma COULD have lived to 97…but she just had to take care of bidness during Jimmy Kimmel.)

 

6. Tuesday, Bloody Tuesday

Apparently, rather than Friday the Thirteenth, Spaniards have Tuesday the Thirteenth. Let’s skip Taco Tuesday that day. We feel behind the eight ball as it is.

 

 

7. The Lonely Corner

According to an adorable Hungarian tradition, if you sit at a corner of the table, you’ll be an old maid, never to marry. (Oh noes!) We’re left to wonder just what host sits a person on a corner anyway…but yeah. Don’t do that.

 

 

8. Sparkling, Clean, Delicious Disaster

An old German spell calls for toasting someone with water rather than  champagne. Upon your first sip, the intended will drop dead. (Like nobody was going to notice that? It’s a wedding, dude. There are a lot of people watching.)

 

9. Shut It

Celts believed a bird flying through an open window portended death. We feel it’s a fair bet that somebody’s going to die at some point in a pretty big village, but we’re installing locks anyway.

 

10. The Acorn of Power

Similar to the Ring of Power in Lord of the Rings, an old Celtic tradition from the British Isles holds that if you carry an acorn in your (nasty little) pocket(ses), you’ll never grow old. Great, plant one on us!

 

11. No Glove, Get Love

Medieval Europeans believed that giving gloves as a gift meant ill luck. It hearkened to small tokens at a joust or other potentially lethal event. Tip: Want to win a lady’s heart? Don’t give her a death sentence. You’re welcome.

 

12. I WOULD Have Gotten the Job…if Not for that Darned Goat

Another quaint Medieval tradition held that if you passed by a wandering goat on your way to seeking employment, you’d never get the job. Manhattanites, beware!

 

13. Lift Your Skirt Up if You Want THIS

No, really. According to a 1914 edition of The Oxford Dictionary of Superstitions, turning the hem of your skirt up will mean you magically receive a brand-new dress. Or…well, that’s what that dude told ya, anyway.

Happy Friday the 13th!

 

Make a Creepy “Skinned” Face

 

When you said you wanted to get tanned, we’ll bet this wasn’t what you meant! We saw this eerie image floating all over Pinterest but were unable to locate the original artist. So we decided to try it out for ourselves – and it’s surprisingly easy.

Here’s how to craft a super-creepy “skinned” (cut away from the skull)-face Halloween prop just like the one shown. Happy haunting – and don’t go into the woods alone.

You Will Need:

  • A creepy latex face mask. Searching for masks under “old man,” “zombie” or “baby” (an example is shown at right) on Amazon or ebay will give you great ideas.*
  • An Exacto knife.
  • Acrylic paints. We suggest deep red, black, and white.
  • Twine.
  • A weathered photo frame large enough to stretch your mask across.
  • Sandpaper, if you want to distress/weather a standard wooden frame.
  • A kitchen or sea sponge and a small paintbrush.
  • A heavy-duty hole punch.
  • Short nails (to go into the sides of the frame).
  • A hammer.

*If you are allergic to latex, look for a realistic non-latex mask. It may not be as stretchy, but you can get a similar effect by distressing the mask as described in the steps below.

Step One: Start Cutting

Credit: juneauempire.com
  1. Cut the face of your mask so it’s easy to stretch somewhat flat. Don’t worry about getting too exact with this. You want it to look cut somewhat haphazardly.
  2. If the eye holes aren’t very large, cut them a bit wider. The idea is that the skin has been cut away from the skull. (We know – eew!)
  3. If the mouth is not open, cut a slit between the lips and make sure it gapes when stretched.
  4. Punch holes near the edges of the face (as shown) using the hole punch. If your hole punch isn’t quite sturdy enough to do the trick, cut holes or slits with your Exacto knife.

Step Two: Add Paint

  1. For depth, dip your dry sponge into some black acrylic paint. Dab lightly on the insides of the eye and mouth holes. Again, don’t be too exact. (TIP: If you already have plenty of depth in the mask, you can skip this and the next step.)
  2. Using a different area of your sponge, add a few dabs of gray inside the eye and mouth holes for more depth. Now extend dabs of sickly gray-black across the face if you wish. Allow to dry.

Step Three: Stretch the Face

  1. If you want to distress your frame, rough it up with your sandpaper and smear streaks using your sponge and the gray paint; allow to dry.
  2. Hammer nails into the outsides of the frame where you want the twine to extend outward. These can be slightly off-kilter; again, messier and more haphazard is better.
  3. Cut pieces of twine for each of the holes you have punched into the mask. Tie one twine piece through each hole.
  4. Pull each piece of twine taut to stretch the mask and make it look extra-creepy. (Be careful not to pull TOO hard or you may tear the mask. Just have it look stretched out, with the eyes and mouth gaping.)
  5. Secure each piece of twine around its corresponding nail and tie tightly.

Step Four: Finishing Touches

Credit: craftsy.com

To give your stretched face gory realism, dab/smear dribbles of red paint onto the mask, the twine, and the photo frame. Remember: messier is better!

You can also mix red with a bit of black to get deeper, “older”/dried-blood colors. Dab with your sponge or toss onto the face with a paintbrush for extra splatter.

Allow your creepy creation to dry completely before hanging. Enjoy!

10 HILARIOUS Sayings For Your Tombstone Prop

 

You’ve created the perfect tombstone prop. It looks creepy, decayed and, well…you dig it. But what about that finishing touch?

That’s right: every awesome Halloween tombstone needs a GREAT epitaph.* Fresh out of killer ideas? These 10 sayings will knock ’em dead! Here are our freaky faves.

* An inscription commemorating one who has passed on, particularly as inscribed on a tombstone.

Don’t worry. Where you’re going, you don’t actually need much space.

 

 

 

We’re all for romance…but if she’d read this first, he’d have been the first one to go.

 

 

 

 

He’s undead eight times and counting.

 

 

 

 

Well now, isn’t somebody going to be surprised…

 

 

 

I mean…you unicycle blindfolded across the freeway in rush hour traffic just ONE time and this is what happens. Sigh.

 

 

 

We’ll never forget Frank. I mean Hal. No. Wait.

 

 

 

 

Oh, mann.

 

 

 

…and on…and on.

 

 

 

 

No kid of the 80s could possibly not have this tombstone in his or her haunt.

 

 

 

 

And of course…

We hope so! What’s Halloween without an unexpected visit or two? HAPPY HALLOWEEN!